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Upcoming Events in the Department of Political Science

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Workshop on Experiments in Foreign Aid Research: Views from Donor and Recipient Publics

This workshop will feature new research on attitudes and behavior toward foreign aid in donor or recipient countries that draws on lab, field and survey experiments. The goals of the workshop are: (1) to bring academic scholars and members of the aid policy and development community together to discuss innovative research on foreign aid's impact on donor and recipient publics, and (2) to facilitate exchange of ideas between the two communities on new research that would be of direct value to policymakers.

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Sinopoli Lecture: Justifying the Jury

Although history provides many arguments in favor of juries, one justification must be paramount: the jury's ability to produce just verdicts. Why should we have any confidence in the jury's reliability? This talk by Melissa Schwartzberg, Silver Professor of Politics at New York University, will examine the egalitarian commitments that underlie our beliefs about the justice of jury verdicts, and how these commitments, and their challenges, shape how we justify democracy more generally.

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The Distortion of Related Beliefs

Andrew Little, assistant professor of political science at UC Berkeley, introduces a model to study the distortion of related beliefs.

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Disenchantment and Dealignment: The Individual-Level Effects of Public‐Party Incongruence

Ryan Bakker, director of the Center for the Study of Global Issues at the University of Georgia, gives a talk on factors contributing to an erosion of democratic norms, dissatisfaction with democracy, and anti‐establishment politics.

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How Issue Publics Hold Legislators Accountable: Evidence from Longitudinal Survey Experiments

David Broockman, assistant professor of political economy at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, discusses findings that Americans are more likely to remember how their legislators voted when legislation impacts them personally.

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Do Electorally Vulnerable Legislators Grant More or Less Statutory Discretion to the Bureaucracy?

Mona Vakilifathi, assistant professor at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University, presents findings from a study of the California State Senate.

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Can Power Sharing Help Build Political Trust Following Civil War? Microlevel Evidence from Mindanao

Caroline Hartzell, professor of political science at Gettysburg College and a UC Davis alumna, draws from survey data in the Philippines to explore the potential for peace agreements to build trust.

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Preferences For and Against Independence: Evidence from Catalonia

Laia Balcells, associate professor of government at Georgetown University, presents findings of a recent survey of Catalans on proposed independence from Spain.

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Accountability Under Devolved Government: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya

Leonardo Arriola, director of UC Berkeley's Center for African Studies, discusses how information and partisanship influences how Kenyan voters evaluate local incumbents.

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