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Graduate Program

Political Science Graduate Program

Our graduate program provides a collaborative environment in which students work closely with faculty to prepare them for successful careers as scholars and teachers of political science. In order to foster this collaborative approach, enrollment in the program is restricted to allow close working relationships with faculty. We generally offer multi-year financial packages to all incoming students through a combination of fellowships, research assistantships, teaching assistantships and readerships so that members of our program can concentrate fully on their studies. The success of our program in preparing students for academic careers is evident in our excellent placement record of students in research universities and liberal arts colleges.

While we offer specialization in all of the traditional subfields in political science, American Politics, Comparative Politics, International Relations, Political Theory, and Methodology, our department encourages training and research that cuts across the traditional fields. Our graduate program is structured to introduce students to a range of approaches to research in political science and the methodological tools needed to do cutting-edge scholarship. Our program also offers numerous opportunities for students to pursue independent and collaborative research, as well as the funding to do so.

 

Professor Brad Jones

Director of Graduate Studies (2013 - 2015)

About the Program

Program Structure and Requirements

Subfields and Faculty

Graduate Student Accomplishments

Program Structure and Requirements

The goal of our PhD program is to train individuals to be effective scholars and teachers of political science. The program begins with a broad introduction to the substantive issues and methodological approaches across political science, then increasingly allows the students to tailor their coursework and other learning opportunities such as collaborative research projects in accordance with their interests, and finally culminates with independent research. Particular attention is given in the program to providing students with opportunities for hands-on experience in both research and teaching, and the financial support and advising to be able to do so.

First Year. The first year program is designed to (re)introduce students to the main subfields of political science and to train them in the methods necessary for consuming and ultimately producing scholarship in the discipline. Students are therefore required to take at least three of the core seminars in the traditional subfields (American Politics, Comparative Politics, International Relations, and Political Theory) and a sequence of methods courses (Introductory Research Methods and Intermediate Research Methods I & II). In addition to these required substantive and methodological courses, students take more advanced seminars in areas of their interest.

Second Year. In the second year, students begin to focus their coursework on their major fields and on the remaining required methodological coursework they may not have completed in their first year (Advanced Research Methods and Introductory Game Theory; or, in the case of first-field political theorists, a year of foreign language). Students produce a plan of study that identifies their three fields of study, the first two of which must be subfields in political science and the third of which may be a field either inside or outside of the discipline. In addition to pursuing their remaining coursework, they take a required two quarter research design seminar in which they undertake a major independent research project, culminating in a paper suitable for submission for publication.

Third Year. Students begin the third year with comprehensive examinations in their first and second fields. During the year, students complete all their required coursework. At the end of the year, students take an oral qualifying examination in order to advance to doctoral candidacy.

Fourth and Fifth Years. After successfully writing and defending a dissertation prospectus, students devote the majority of their time to independent research centering on their doctoral thesis. In addition, students at an advanced stage are given opportunities to do independent teaching.

Subfields and Faculty

American Politics

The study of American politics at Davis engages a broad range of questions central to understanding democratic processes and institutions in the US. Faculty research and teaching covers the major institutions of American national government, including the Congress, courts, presidency, and the political parties. The faculty in American politics includes recognized experts on the electoral process, with interests in the study of political behavior, citizen participation and engagement, and political representation. Faculty members employ a diverse range of approaches in their research including experimental, survey, archival, and formal methods. Students in the subfield are encouraged to develop their analytical and methodological skills, as well as a sophisticated understanding of the scholarly literature on political behavior and institutions. Current graduate students in American politics actively participate in the department's micro-politics group, the omnibus program of experimental research, among other faculty-graduate student research collaborations.

Comparative Politics

Many of the core questions in political science can be addressed particularly profitably within the broad approach known as comparative politics. Traditionally, scholars of American politics were best able to address systematically many of the central political science questions about the ways domestic politics operate because of the high quality of data in areas such as public opinion, elite and electoral behavior, and political institutions. As the quality and quantity of data on other countries increased, however, scholars in comparative politics have been able to provide some of the most compelling answers to the core questions in the discipline. The reason is simple: a frankly comparative approach introduces cross-national and cross-cultural variation into our research designs. At Davis, our view is that such an approach offers substantial advantages over a more "area-studies" focus. Accordingly, although most of our faculty members possess detailed knowledge of various countries and regions of the world, we have built our comparative politics program around an explicitly comparative orientation.

International Relations

When do states go to war? What affects trade and immigration patterns? Which counter-terrorism strategies work? Is the enemy of my enemy truly my friend? How does war affect leaders, public opinion, and elections? These are just some of the critical international politics questions studied at Davis. Traditionally, international politics focused exclusively on the influence of the international system. While arguments about the democratic theory have clearly challenged that approach, our perspective moves far afield from an international system outlook and instead focuses on the intersection of domestic and international politics, examining both international conflict and political economy. We employ a number of different approaches (such as rational choice, social networks, political psychology, and prospect theory). Faculty frequently publish with graduate students, and also work closely with other subfields. Our research employs a variety of empirical methods, including statistical analyses, mathematical models, experiments and case studies. Our goal is to ask questions that have relevance for the global future and answers from the international relations past, and to examine them creatively and rigorously.

Political Theory

In the political theory subfield at Davis we take a broadly textual approach to the history of political thought, focusing on major political philosophers from the ancient, medieval, modern, and contemporary eras. We provide our students with training in textual analysis that is also sensitive to the broader philosophic issues and historical contexts necessary for understanding these texts. While we offer courses across the entire range of the history of political thought, including seminars focusing on a single thinker or text, our program is particularly strong in the early modern era. The faculty and students in political theory form an unusually active and cohesive group. In addition to regularly offered graduate seminars, we have a reading group that meets regularly, allowing students and faculty to explore topics in political theory of common interest.

Faculty: Shalini SatkunanandanJohn T. ScottRobert S. Taylor

Affiliate Faculty: John G. Gunnell

Methodology

Political methodology is a rapidly growing field in the discipline of political science.  The field generally deals with issues of measurement of interesting political phenomenon and developing, improving, and creatively applying statistical methods and formal models to political data.  At Davis, we have a strong commitment to training students to learn a variety of statistical methods and formal theory while at the same time teaching students to think carefully about the nature of the data and the assumptions of the models given the data.  Within statistics, we offer a variety of courses on a wide range of topics, including linear modeling, duration modeling, Bayesian statistics, time-series, hierarchical modeling, and discrete-choice modeling.  Likewise, in formal theory we offer courses that cover a range of areas, including game theory, social choice theory, formal and spatial modeling, and the empirical testing of formal models.

Graduate Student Accomplishments

 

Our graduate students have been highly successful in their scholarship and in gaining professional recognition. Some of the recent publications, fellowships, and awards our students have received during their graduate career at Davis are listed below. For the accomplishments of the graduates of our program, please visit the Placements page.

2015

Christopher P. Donnelly, "Balancing Act?  Testing a Theory of Split-Party U.S. Senate Delegations," Electoral Studies, Forthcoming.

2014

Jesse R. Hammond, "Using machine-coded event data for the micro-level study of political violence," Research and Politics (with Nils Weidmann)

Timothy W. Taylor, “The Electoral Salience of Trade Policy: Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Welfare and Complexity,” International Interactions, Forthcoming.

2013

Shareefa Al-Adwani, 2013 - 2014 Herbert F. York Global Security Dissertation Fellowship, UC Institute of Global Conflict and Cooperation.

Richard Bairett, "Institutions and the Stabilization of Party Systems in the New Democracies of Central and Eastern Europe," Forthcoming in Electoral Studies (with Josephine T. Andrews).

Jesse R. Hammond, "Capitol Mobility: Madisonian Representation and the Location and Relocation of Capitals in the United States," American Political Science Review (with Erik Engstrom and John T. Scott).

Jesse R. Hammond, "An examination of the relationship between international telecommunication networks, terrorism and global news coverage," Social Networks and Data Mining (with George Barnett).

Jesse R. Hammond, 2013 Pre-Doctoral Fellowship, University of Konstanz

Danielle A. Joesten, "Explaining Proximity Voting in 2006," Journal of Politics (with Walter Stone).

Richard A.I. Johnson, “Politics and Parasites: The Contribution of Corruption to Human Misery." International Studies Quarterly (with Randolph Siverson).

Timothy P. Jurka, "RTextTools: A Supervised Learning Package for Text Classication." The R Journal (with L. Collingwood, A.E. Boydstun, E. Grossman, and W. van Atteveldt).

Matthew Lesenyie, 2013 Dean's Prize for Best Oral Presentation in the Social Sciences for "Torts of Appeal: Do Elected Judges Rule Differently than Appointed Judges?" UC Davis Interdisciplinary Graduate and Professional Student Symposium

Aaron Shreve, 2013 - 2014 International Nuclear Security Fellowship Competition, UC Institute of Global Conflict and Cooperation.

Andrey Tomashevskiy, "Trade and Democracy: Which Leads and How?" Forthcoming in The International Political Economy of Trade, ed. David Deese (Edward Elgar, U.K.).

Shaina Western, “Levels of Linkage: Across-Agreement v. Within-Agreement Explanations of Consensus Formation Among States” International Studies Quarterly (with Heather McKibben).

2012

Richard Bairett, 2012 - 2013, Provost's Dissertation Year Fellowship in The Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences.

Chris Hallenbrook, 2012 - 2013, Research Fellowship, Mellon Research Initiative in Early Modern Studies.

Alicja Jac-Kucharski, "The Determinants of Human Trafficking: A US Case Study." International Migration.

Timothy P. Jurka, “maxent: An R Package for Low-memory Multinomial Logistic Regression with Support for Semi-automated Text Classification.” The R Journal.

Matthew Lesenyie, “Power to the People: Checking Special Interests in California,” The California Journal of Politics and Policy (with Stacy Gordon Fisher and Kimberly Nalder).

Tracy K. Lin, 2012 - 2013 Dissertation Fellowship and Research Support, UC Institute of Global Conflict and Cooperation.

Matthew T. Pietryka, “Going Maverick: How Candidates Can Use Agenda-Setting to Influence Citizen Motivations and Offset Unpopular Issue Positions.” Political Behavior (with Amber Boydstun).

Jack Reilly, "Networks, Interdependence, and Social Inuence in Politics," The Oxford Handbook of Political Psychology, eds. Leonie Huddy, David O. Sears, and Jack Levy. New York: Oxford University Press (with Robert Huckfeldt, Jeery J. Mondak, Matthew Hayes, and Matthew T. Pietryka).

2011

Matthew K. Buttice and Caitlin Milazzo. “Candidate Positioning in Britain.” Electoral Studies.

Kevin Evans and Elizabeth Simas, “Linking Party Platforms to Perceptions of Presidential Candidates’ Policy Positions, 1972-2000,” Political Research Quarterly.

Richard A. I. Johnson "Militarized Refugee Camps: Causes and Consequences", Journal of Refugee Studies.

Milosz Kucharski, “China in the Age of American Primacy.” International Relations.

Milosz Kucharski, “Balancing Unipolarity: Russian Responses to American Preeminence.” Stosunki Międzynarodowe – International Relations.

Debra Leiter, 2011 – 2013 Bilinski Fellowship.

Debra Leiter, "Which Voting Subconstituencies Reacted to Elite Depolarization in the Netherlands? An Analysis of the Dutch Public’s Policy Beliefs and Partisan Loyalties, 1986-1998," British Journal of Political Science (with James Adams and Catherine De Vries).

Sarah P. Lockhart, 2011. "The Trans-Tasman Travel Arrangement." In Migration, Nation States, and International Cooperation, eds. Randall Hansen, Jobst Koehler, and Jeannette Money. New York: Routledge (with Jeannette Money).

Caitlin Milazzo, “When Do You Follow the (National) Leader? Party Switching by Subnational Legislators in Japan.” Electoral Studies (with Ethan Scheiner).

Michelle Schwarze, 2011 – 2013 Bilinski Fellowship.

Michelle Schwarze, 2011 – 2012 UC Davis Graduate Student Research Mentorship Award.

Elizabeth Simas, “When Candidates Value Good Job Performance: A Spatial Model with Applications to Congressional Elections.” Journal of Politics (with James Adams, Samuel Merrill, and Walter Stone).

John M. Warner, "Sin City: Augustine and Machiavelli's Reordering of Rome," Journal of Politics (with John T. Scott).

Shaina Western, Best Graduate Student Paper Award for “A Social Explanation of Commitment: A Reevaluation of States' Commitment Against Torture,” International Studies Association – West.

2010

Alexander K. Mayer, "Does Education Increase Political Participation?" Journal of Politics.

Alexander K. Mayer, NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (2008-2011).

Caitlin Milazzo, “Has the British Public Depolarized Along with Political Elites? An American Perspective on British Public Opinion,” Comparative Political Studies (with James Adams and Jane Green).

Elizabeth Simas, “Risk Orientation and Policy Frames.” Journal of Politics (with Cindy Kam).

James R. Zink, “Reconsidering the Role of Self-Respect in Rawl’s A Theory of Justice,” Journal of Politics.

2009

Belgin San Akca, "Supporting Non-State Armed Groups: A Resort to Illegality?" Journal of Strategic Studies.

Matthew Buttice "Polarization, Attribution and Communication Networks in the 2006 Congressional Elections," in Jeffery J. Mondak and Donna-Gene Mitchell, eds. Fault Lines: Why the Republicans Lost Congress (Routledge) (with John Barry Ryan and Robert Huckfeldt).

Skyler J. Cranmer, "Demography, Democracy, and Disputes: The Search for the Elusive Relationship Between Population Growth and International Conflict," Journal of Politics (with Randolph M. Siverson).

Skyler J. Cranmer, "Do Governments of the Left Attract more Terrorism than Governments of the Right?" Conflict Management and Peace Science (with Michael T. Koch).

Nikolas Emmanuel, "U.S. Incentive Strategies in African Conflicts," in Mathew Hoddie and Caroline Hartzell, Enforcing Peace (Lynne Rienner) (with Donald S. Rothchild).

Kris Inman, NSF Dissertation Improvement Grant.

Alexander K. Mayer, "Politics, Expertise, and Interdependence within Electorates," in Jan Leighley, ed., The Oxford Handbook of American Elections and Political Behavior (Oxford University Press) (with T.K. Ahn, Robert Huckfeldt, and John Barry Ryan).

Molly M. Melin, "Management and the Durability of Peace," in Sage Handbook on Conflict Resolution (with Scott Sigmund Gartner).

Carl L. Palmer, Journal of Politics Best Paper Award (with Cindy D. Kam).

Jennifer M. Ramos, "Sovereignty and Cognitive Dissonance," in Amy Eckert and Laura Sjoberg, eds., Rethinking the 21st Century: 'Old Solutions to 'New' Problems (Zed Books).

John Barry Ryan, "Polarization, Attribution and Communication Networks in the 2006 Congressional Elections," in Jeffery J. Mondak and Donna-Gene Mitchell, eds. Fault Lines: Why the Republicans Lost Congress (Routledge) (with Matthew Buttice and Robert Huckfeldt).

John Barry Ryan, "Politics, Expertise, and Interdependence within Electorates," in Jan Leighley, ed., The Oxford Handbook of American Elections and Political Behavior (Oxford University Press) (with T.K. Ahn, Robert Huckfeldt, and Alex Mayer).

Marc Scarcelli, "Exceptional Cases: The 'Boat Peoples' of Cuba and Haiti," in David Kyle and Rey Kozlowski, eds., Global Human Smuggling: Comparative Perspectives, 2nd Edition (Johns Hopkins) (with David Kyle).

Marc Scarcelli, "Religion and Civil Conflict in Africa," in Edmond Keller, ed., Religious Ideas and Institutions and Transitions to Democracy in Africa.

Zeynep Somer-Topcu, "Survival of the Fittest? Cabinet Duration in Post-Communist Europe," Comparative Politics (with Laron Williams).

Zeynep Somer-Topcu, "Timely Decisions: The Effects of Past National Elections on Party Policy." Journal of Politics.

Zeynep Somer-Topcu, "Do Parties Adjust Their Policies in Response to Rival Parties' Policy Shifts? Spatial Theory and the Dynamics of Party Competition in Twenty-Five Postwar Democracies," British Journal of Political Science (with James Adams).

James R. Zink, "Courting the Public: The Influence of Decision Attributes on Individuals: Views of Court Opinions," Journal of Politics (with James F. Spriggs II and John T. Scott).

James R. Zink, "The Language of Liberty and Law: James Wilson on America’s Written Constitution," American Political Science Review.

2008

Ronni Abney, Andrea Morrison, and Gary A. Stradiotto, "The Stability of Representation: A Cross-National Analysis of Party Policy Dispersion," Representation.

Richard Bairett, UC Davis Graduate Scholars Fellowship Recipient.

Nikolas Emmanuel, "Economic Aid and Peace Implementation: The African Experience," Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding (with Donald Rothchild).

Molly M. Melin, "Potential Peacemakers: Establishing a Population of Third Parties Considering Mediation," in Jacob Bercovitch and Scott Sigmund Gartner, eds., Empirical Studies in International Mediation: New Approaches and Findings (Routledge) (with Scott Sigmund Gartner).

Carl L. Palmer, "Reconsidering the Effects of Education on Political Participation," Journal of Politics (with Cindy D. Kam).

John Barry Ryan, NSF Dissertation Improvement Grant.

Aimee A. Tannehill. 2008. "Negotiating with the Dragon: The Peopleâ€&™s Republic of China and International Dispute Settlement Duration." Tamkang Journal of International Affairs (with Scott Sigmund Gartner).

Jennifer R. Wilking, "From the Gap to the Chasm: Gender and Participation among Non-Hispanic Whites and Mexican Americans," Political Research Quarterly (with Cindy D. Kam and Elizabeth J. Zechmeister).

2007

Leo Blanken, Best Dissertation Award from the Western Political Science Association.

Monti Datta, "Of Paradise, Power and Pachyderms," Political Science Quarterly (with Miroslav Nincic)

Gregory Love, "Who Rides the Storm? Political Institutions and Trade Adjustment," Business and Politics (with Daniel Y. Kono).

Molly M. Melin, Folke Bernadotte Academy Research Grant.

Carl L. Palmer, Pi Sigma Alpha Award for best paper presented at the 2006 Midwest Political Science Association meeting (with Cindy D. Kam).

Jennifer M. Ramos, "Crisis, Charisma and Consequences: Evidence from the 2004 US Presidential Election." Journal of Politics (with Jennifer Merolla and Elizabeth Zechmeister).

Jennifer M. Ramos, University of California Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation Dissertation Fellowship, 2007-2008.

John Barry Ryan, Paul Lazarsfeld Best Paper Award by the American Political Science Association Organized Section on Political Communication (with Robert Huckfeldt and T.K. Ahn).

Gary A. Stradiotto, "The Nature and Direction of Economic Reform in North Korea," Political Studies (with Sujian Guo).

Gary A. Stradiotto, "Market Socialism in North Korea: A Comparative Perspective," Journal of the Asia Pacific Economy (with Sujian Guo).

Jennifer R. Wilking, "Beyond the 'Narrow Data Base': Another Convenience Sample for Experimental Research," Political Behavior (with Cindy D. Kam and Elizabeth J. Zechmeister).

Admissions

Graduate Admissions

UC Davis is 15 miles west of Sacramento and 72 miles northeast of San Francisco. The campus is among the most popular in the UC system because of its outstanding academic reputation and congenial atmosphere for living and studying. The Department of Political Science offers a PhD program and a JD/MA joint degree program that can only be done in conjunction with the UC Davis School of Law. For more information please click on the link below.

Graduate Program Brochure

Admission Procedures

 

The admission application (required) and fellowship application (encouraged, but not required) must be completed through the online application system. The admission application and fellowship application, along with instructions, will be available through the Office of Graduate Studies website (http://gradstudies.ucdavis.edu) beginning in early September.

 

The Department of Political Science accepts PhD applications and MA/JD joint program applications.  Please note that we do not offer a stand-alone MA program. Applicants for the MA/JD program must also apply directly to the UC Davis Law School if not already a law student.

For full consideration and review your application must be completed by December 15th and any transcripts must be post-marked by December 15th.

The following information is required and will need to be submitted online as part of your admission application:

  • Initial application (online).
  • Application fee of $80 for the domestic application and $100 for the international application.  The fee may be paid by credit card or e-check.  The fee must be paid before the application will be considered as complete, and the fee must be paid for each application submitted.
  • Three "Letters of Recommendation" must be uploaded by your letter writers through the online application system (letters must be submitted online, no paper letters will be accepted).
  • GRE (Graduate Record Examination) scores.  These scores must be current (taken within the last 5 years) and should be sent electronically directly from ETS to UC Davis.  The ETS code for UC Davis is 4834, the code for Political Science is 1902.
  • TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing System) scores if you have not studied at an institution and received a degree where the language of instruction is English.  These scores must be current (taken with the last 2 years). TOEFL should be sent electronically directly from ETS to UC Davis. IELTS scores should be mailed directly UC Davis from IELTS.
  • Writing sample must be submitted electronically as part of the online application.

Beginning this year, UC Davis graduate programs are no longer accepting paper transcripts as a part of the application process.  Instead, all applicants must upload PDF versions of their transcripts or academic records directly to our system.  Please follow this link for further instructions about uploading transcripts: https://gradstudies.ucdavis.edu/prospective-students/admissions-application/submitting-your-transcripts

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Graduate Courses

Political Science Graduate Courses

2013 - 2014

  • Please click Here to download tentative course offerings for 2013-2014. (PDF)

2012 - 2013

  • Please click Here to download tentative course offerings for 2012-2013. (PDF)

2011 - 2012

  • Please click Here to download tentative course offerings for 2011-2012. (PDF)

2010 - 2011

  • Please click Here to download course offerings for 2010-2011. (PDF)

2009 - 2010

  • Please click Here to download course offerings for 2009-2010. (PDF)

 

    The above listing of courses are correct to the best of our knowledge. Changes may occur in instructors and/or courses after the publication of this schedule. For questions regarding specific courses consult the Course Schedule or contact the Department of Political Science at (530) 752-0966.

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    Job Market Candidates

    Placement Candidates


    American Politics

    • Christopher P. Donnelly, "Understanding Representation: How Citizens Evaluate and Elect U.S. Senators
    • Jordan Kujala, "Donors, Primary Elections, and the Success of Polarized Candidates in the United States"
    • Yoonjung Lee, "Irrational Actors, Rational Decisions: The Conditions and Consequences of Biased Information Processing"

     

    Comparative Politics

    • Christy Cahill, "The Causes and Consequences of Policy Ambiguity for European Political Parties" 
    • Yuhui Li, "Multiparism and the “Beauty of Cycling”: Explaining Minorities' Bargaining Power under Majority Rule"
    • Nathan Rexford, "The Impact of Electoral Rules on Party Issue Positions"

     

    International Relations

    • Tracy Lin, "The Health of Nations: International Influences and Domestic Response"

    • Joseph Picek, "Building the Norms of War: Tools and Targeting in US Military Doctrine"
    • Aaron Shreve, "All I want is a Little Respect: How Status Inconsistency Affects Cooperative and Conflictual State Behavior"

    • Daniel Tapia-Jimenez, "Technology and Cooperation in World Politics"
    • Andrey Tomashevskiy, "Political Investments: The Political Causes and Effects of International Capital Flows"
    • Shaina D. Western, "Hollow Commitments: An Analysis of Institutional Design and Ratification Rates"

     

    Political Theory

    • Christopher Hallenbrook"Constrained Absolutism: The Power to Protect, the Rights of Subjects and the Duties of Sovereignty in Hobbes’s Political Thought"
    • Joel Landis, “David Hume on the Psychology and Nature of Political Party”
    • R.Lee McNish, "Virtuous Liberalism: Individuality and Virtue Ethics in Liberal Thought”
    • Sara Price“What Can Be Done in Light of What Has Been Done: The Intersection of Theory and Practice in Rousseau”

     


    cahill picChristy Cahill

    Primary Field: Comparative Politics
    Secondary Field: Political Methodology
    PhD expected June 2017

    My dissertation focuses on the causes and consequences of party policy ambiguity for European political parties.  The first chapter examines the incentives for parties to present ambiguous policy positions to the electorate.  I find that worsening economic conditions and institutional factors influence parties to present more ambiguous policy positions to the electorate.  I also find evidence that private campaign contributions to political parties incentivize parties to present increasingly ambiguous policy positions.  My second chapter focuses on the corresponding electoral consequences of policy ambiguity.   I find that parties with ambiguous policy positions are increasingly punished in vote-shares as the effective number of parties in a system increases.  Finally, I examine the attributes that affect how individuals evaluate policy ambiguity.  In particular, I look at how political sophistication and socioeconomic status affect voters' evaluations of party policy ambiguity.  I supplement the three quantitative chapters with a chapter based on interviews with Members of Parliament in England and Germany, in which MPs describe the conditions under which they were strategically ambiguous or clear to voters about their parties' policy positions.    

    Dissertation: "The Causes and Consequences of Policy Ambiguity for European Political Parties"

    Dissertation Committee Composition

    Jim Adams (Chair), Walt Stone, Matthew Shugart, Ethan Scheiner

    Christy Cahill CV
    E-mail:

    www.christinemcahill.com

    donelly, chris updated photoChristopher P. Donnelly

    Primary Field: American Politics
    Secondary Field: Methodology
    PhD expected June 2017

    My research centers around American representation, with a particular interest in the various decision rules and shortcuts that citizens use to evaluate candidates and elected representatives alike.  Situated in the particular institutional context of the U.S. Senate, my dissertation consists of three chapters, each of which examines such a unique decision rule or shortcut that citizens might use to evaluate U.S. Senate candidates or U.S. Senators.  The first chapter, which was published in the June 2015 issue of Electoral Studies, seeks to explain the emergence of split-party U.S. Senate delegations--the phenomenon by which a state's voters elect one Democrat and one Republican to represent them in the Senate.  Specifically, the article assesses whether split-party U.S. Senate delegations arise from strategic "balancing," whereby voters seek to bring the average preferences of their state's two senators closer to the middle and, as a result, might choose the U.S. Senate contender to whom they are less ideologically proximate.  The second chapter, which currently has a "Revise & Resubmit" at Legislative Studies Quarterly, employs survey data regarding individuals' perceptions of their senators' voting behavior on various issues to assess the degree to which citizens use party cues to infer their senators' roll call behavior.  More importantly, I examine the degree to which use of such cues might lead citizens astray, as party cues will lead to the wrong inference when a senator votes against her party.  Finally, motivating the third chapter is the fact that while a great deal of research has been done to understand the causes of the "gender gap"--the tendency for women to support Democratic candidates and policies at higher rates than men--little has been done to understand why its size varies across different elections. In this vein, I seek to explain variation in the size of the "gender gap"--the difference between the percentage of the vote that males and females give to the Republican candidate--across different U.S. Senate elections, with a particular eye towards the gender breakdown of the two major-party candidates as a possible heuristic that voters might use in arriving at their candidate choices.  Each of these chapters, then, contributes to our understanding of the linkages between political elites and the citizens that they represent, or seek to represent.   

    Dissertation: "Understanding Representation: How Citizens Evaluate and Elect U.S. Senators."

    Dissertation Committee Composition

    Erik Engstrom (Chair), Frances E. Lee (University of Maryland), Cheryl Boudreau, Jim Adams

    Chris Donnelly CV
    E-mail:

    http://www.christopherpdonnelly.com/

    Chris Hallenbrook

    Primary Field: Political Theory
    Secondary Field: American Politics
    PhD awarded August 2015

    My research agenda focuses on the nature of the relationship between individuals and their governments, particularly in the political thought of the 17th and 18th century Anglo-American world. I explore questions of the origin of political obligation, how to resolve conflict between political obligation and other nexuses of obligation, the circumstances that cause political obligation to be nullified, and the avenues of action that are left open to individuals in the aftermath of the cessation of obligation. In my dissertation I explore the origin and nullification of political obligation in the writings of Thomas Hobbes, and argue Hobbes conceives of both rights of subjects and duties of sovereigns that are more expansive and more substantive than has been typically recognized.

    Dissertation: "Constrained Absolutism: The Power to Protect, the Rights of Subjects and the Duties of Sovereignty in Hobbes’s Political Thought"

    Dissertation Committee Composition
    John T. Scott (Chair), Robert S. Taylor, Shalini Satkunanandan

    Chris Hallenbrook CV
    E-mail: 

    Jordan Kujala
    Primary Field: American Politics
    Secondary Field: Political Methodology
    PhD expected June 2017

    My research focuses on ideological representation in the United States. More specifically, I am interested in understanding sources of ideological polarization and the role elections play in modern American politics. In my dissertation, I investigate representation using a unique data set that places congressional candidates on the same ideological dimension as their primary, general election, and partisan donor constituencies. With this data, I find strong evidence that the influence of co-partisans and donors in primary elections are sources of polarization in the United States. On the other hand, I find that general elections act as a moderating force. Major party nominees are punished in the general election for their extremity, and partisans appear to respond by supporting more moderate candidates in competitive districts. However, given a lack of competitive districts, the polarizing effects of partisan constituencies dominate any moderating effects resulting in ideologically extreme nominees and, ultimately, members of Congress.

    Dissertation: "Donors, Primary Elections, and the Success of Polarized Candidates in the United States"

    Dissertation Committee Composition
    Walt Stone (Co-Chair), Ben Highton (Co-Chair), and Jim Adams

    Jordan Kujala CV
    E-mail:

    landis picJoel Landis
    Primary Field: Political Theory
    PhD expected June 2017

    Parties, as was famously said, are the “orphans of political philosophy.” My research seeks to address this remarkable silence in political theory by investigating the oft overlooked but rich resources for thinking about party and faction found throughout the history of political thought. In my dissertation, I examine David Hume’s philosophical and historical project in order to articulate his theory of party. Hume shows how political divisions can be explained as natural products of our psychology, and how the religious and philosophical speculation that gained such prominence in the modern experience might exacerbate this psychological propensity toward division.

    Dissertation: “David Hume on the Psychology and Nature of Political Party”

    Dissertation Committee Composition
    John T. Scott (Chair), Robert S. Taylor, and Shalini Satkunanandan

    Joel Landis CV
    E-mail:

    Lee photoYoonjung Lee
    Primary Field: American Politics
    Secondary Field: Political Methodology
    PhD expected June 2016

    My research focuses on the role of political and social identities in opinion formation. I use lab and field experiments to test the effect of different informational contexts on the salience of different identities. My dissertation argues that competing group identities and their salience to voters should lessen the effect of partisan bias when evaluating policy issues. According to the literature on partisan motivated reasoning, we should expect partisans to keep reinforcing their partisan views, however, I find that depending on the type of issue and the identity that is made salient through priming. Broadly speaking, I am interested in survey and experimental design as a method for testing psychological processes in micro-politics.

    Dissertation: "Irrational Actors, Rational Decisions: The Conditions and Consequences of Biased Information Processing"

    Dissertation Committee Composition
    Cheryl Boudreau (Co-chair), Bob Huckfeldt (Co-chair), and Brad Jones

    Yoonjung Lee CV
    E-mail:

    Li photoYuhui Li

    Primary Field: Comparative Politics
    Secondary Field: Political Theory
    PhD expected June 2017

    My research interests mainly cover how formal institutions, especially electoral systems and executive structures, affect policy outcomes and democratic performance, with special attentions paid to applied theories in institutional design that built on scholars such as Taagepera, Lijphart, and Shugart. 

    My dissertation, Multiparism and the “Beauty of Cycling”: Explaining Minorities' Bargaining Power under Majority Rule>, connects social choice theories with the comparative studies of party systems and addresses two long established but insufficiently answered questions in political science: First, why do the losers of the electoral games receive more distributive benefits in some democracies than in others? And second, in countries where distributions are highly biased against the minorities, does there exist an effective institutional solution? It first advances a theory on the relationship between minority protection and the defection costs from the winning coalition and tests it with a novel online rational choice experiment. It then makes the argument that parliamentarism and proportional representation just by themselves can reduce the defection costs and supports it with an analysis of an original vote share data.

    Dissertation: "Multiparism and the “Beauty of Cycling”: Explaining Minorities' Bargaining Power under Majority Rule"

    Dissertation Committee Composition
    Matthew S. Shugart (Chair), James Adams, and Ethan Scheiner

    Yuhui Li CV

    E-mail:


    photo of Tracy LinTracy Lin
    Primary Field: International Relations
    Secondary Field: Political Methodology
    PhD awarded December 2014

    My dissertation investigates how international factors — foreign aid, intergovernmental organizations, trade, conflict, and refugee flows — affect national health outcomes. Specifically, I examine how domestic health systems mediate the effect of these factors on public health. I argue that international pressures have more benign effects on public health when domestic health systems have stable funding, an institutionalized commitment to healthcare, and robust regulations. This is because such health systems restrict governments’ discretionary power on health expenditures and public health issues. My research thus illuminates how the design of domestic health systems can maximize the benefits from international cooperation while minimizing the costs of external shocks.

    Dissertation: "The Health of Nations: International Influences and Domestic Response"

    Dissertation Committee Composition
    Zeev Maoz (Chair), Ellen Gold (Department of Public Health Sciences), Heather McKibben, and Jeannette Money

    Tracy K. Lin CV
    E-mail: 
    Website: www.tracykuolin.com

    McNish temp photoR. Lee McNish
    Primary Field: Political Theory
    Secondary Field: American Politics
    PhD expected March 2017

    I am broadly interested in the study of ethics and politics, in particular how ethical theories are realized into political institutions, and how these theories can be potentially morphed in response to demands from a non-ideal world. My dissertation is focused on the history of virtue ethics and its relation to liberalism and individuality, specifically in the theories of Thomas Hobbes and Adam Smith. My other research is focused on issues of moral and political obligation in social contract theory, with an emphasis on the theory of Thomas Hobbes.

    Dissertation: “Virtuous Liberalism: Individuality and Virtue Ethics in Liberal Thought”

    Dissertation Committee Composition

    John T. Scott (chair); Robert S. Taylor; Shalini Satkunanandan

    R. Lee McNish CV

    E-mail: rwmcnish@ucdavis.edu


    picek picJoseph Picek

    Primary Field: International Relations
    PhD expected January 2017

    My primary research interest is in the effects of technology change on state behavior. For empirical research, this means analyzing the effects of technology on state perceptions of possible, desirable, and appropriate actions. However, military technological development is a political project, and therefore endogenous to the normative developments themselves. My dissertation focuses on the impact of weapons on a state’s understanding of its obligations under the laws of war. Additionally, I have a research interest in the intersection of international relations and political theory. My political theory interest is in the ethics of international action, including the laws of war.

    Dissertation:"Building the Norms of War: Tools and Targeting in US Military Doctrine"

    Dissertation Committee Composition
    Miroslav Nincic (chair), Heather McKibben, Brandon Kinne

    Joseph Picek CV
    E-mail: jdpicek@ucdavis.edu


    Sara Price Sara Price

    Primary Field: Political Theory
    PhD awarded Fall 2012

    The main question that I tackle in my dissertation is investigating the intersection between theory and practice in the political works of Rousseau. I show that by understanding Rousseau on this dimension, one can obtain a clearer picture of his project and his particular contribution to political theory, namely, that rather than merely presenting a polemical critique to his contemporaries and to posterity, he in fact has a practical philosophy in his works. This approach combats the one-dimensional views of Rousseau stemming from a pessimist-idealist dichotomy one often sees in the secondary literature. I reconstruct a practical positive theory of political association that is organic and self-correcting, and for which forward progress is possible..

    Dissertation:"What Can Be Done in Light of What Has Been Done: The Intersection of Theory and Practice in Rousseau"

    Dissertation Committee Composition
    John T. Scott (chair), Robert S. Taylor, Julia Simon (French)

    Sara Price CV
    E-mail: sllprice@ucdavis.edu
    Website: www.saralprice.weebly.com

    rexford picNathan Rexford
    Primary Field: Comparative Politics
    Secondary Field: Political Methodology
    PhD expected June 2017

    Whether electoral rules impact party system polarization has been the focus of a lively but inconclusive debate over the last ten years. While my work also focuses on the potential impact of electoral rules on party positioning, I shift my attention away from conventional left-right measures to individual issue positions. Specifically, I argue that more proportional electoral rules lead to party systems more polarized across specific issue dimensions via parties that are willing to take more extreme positions on select issues relative to the rest of their platform as well as place a greater emphasis on these issues.  To accomplish this task, I employ more refined measures of electoral permissiveness as well as newly updated expert survey data. 

    Dissertation: "The Impact of Electoral Rules on Party Issue Positions"

    Dissertation Committee Composition:

    James Adams (co-chair), Matthew Shugart (co-chair), Ethan Scheiner

    Nathan Rexford CV

    E-mail: njrexford@ucdavis.edu

    Shreve temp photoAaron Shreve
    Primary Field: International Relations
    Secondary Field: Political Methodology
    PhD expected March 2017

    What happens when states are not ascribed status that is commensurate with their achievements? What are the effects on conflictual and cooperative behavior when states receive more status than their achievements suggest they deserve?  My research focuses on these status inconsistencies in the international system. States are status inconsistent (SI) when ascribed status (i.e. prestige) and achieved status (i.e. achievements) are incongruent. I make two key theoretical points. First, two types of SI can affect state behavior. Negative SI, the most common conception of SI, occurs when achieved status outpaces ascribed status. Positive SI, where ascribed status is greater than achieved status, also affects state behavior. Next, both positive and negative SI can influence conflictual and cooperative state behavior depending on the duration of change in SI and the duration of SI. SI leads states to exhibit both conflictual behavior, like conflict and arms buildups, and cooperative behavior, such as foreign aid and peacekeeping operations, as a means of building and keeping prestige.

    Dissertation: "All I want is a Little Respect: How Status Inconsistency Affects Cooperative and Conflictual State Behavior"

    Dissertation Committee Composition:

    Zeev Maoz (chair), Miroslav Nincic, Kyle Joyce

    Aaron Shreve CV

    E-mail: apshreve@ucdavis.edu

    tapia-jimenez picDaniel Tapia-Jimenez
    Primary Field: International Relations
    Secondary Field: Political Methodology
    PhD expected Spring 2017

    How does technology affect cooperation between states? Answers to this question are complicated by the reality that technological developments do not yield linear changes in political responses; both changes and reactions are often non-linear and multifaceted. While the consequences of technological changes for international cooperation are difficult to discern, my dissertation attempts to clarify this relationship by building on an existing framework that identifies four ways technologies may affect international relations. Within this framework, technological effects can be straightforward changes in states’ capabilities or nuanced shifts in their beliefs, for example. As these effects can alter countries’ strategic considerations, I derive hypotheses that describe the conditions under which cooperative behavior can be expected. With original data on incidents of cooperation and non-cooperation (related to developments in agricultural biotechnology and cyber security), fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis is employed to determine whether cooperation is systematically related to the presence of technological effects and their respective conditions. Ultimately the dissertation aims to demonstrate that its approach affords a more comprehensive understanding of technology’s relationship to international relations.

    Dissertation: "Technology and Cooperation in World Politics"

    Dissertation Committee Composition
    Heather McKibben (Chair), Miroslav Nincic, Jeannette Money

    Daniel Tapia-Jimenez CV

    E-mail: datapiajimenez@ucdavis.edu

    Andrey Tomashevskiy
    Primary Field: International Relations
    Secondary Field: Political Methodology
    PhD awarded March 2015

    My dissertation consists of three essays focused around the relationship between politics and international investment. I examine the impact of investment in two distinct issue areas: government partisanship and authoritarian regime stability. I develop a formal model to explicate the relationship between Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and the likelihood of coups in authoritarian regimes. The model predicts and I find support for a non-linear, U-shaped relationship between FDI and risk of coups. Second, I argue that increasing portfolio investment contributes to electoral success of right-wing parties. I find evidence for this hypothesis using a new dataset on political contributions to right wing parties. Lastly, I examine the influence of information and common international ties on inflows of foreign direct investment. I predict FDI flows by using a network model to account for complex interdependencies present within the global network of FDI.

    Dissertation: "Political Investments: The Political Causes and Effects of International Capital Flows"

    Dissertation Committee Composition
    Daniel Kono (Chair), Zeev Maoz, Gabriella Montinola

    Andrey Tomashevskiy CV
    E-mail: atomashevskiy@ucdavis.edu
    Website: atomashevskiy.weebly.com

    ShainaWesternShaina Western

    Primary Field: International Relations
    Secondary Field: Methodology
    PhD awarded June 2015

    My primary research agenda focuses on understanding the nature of global governance. Specifically, I focus on understanding the variation in global governance based on the tendency of governments to adopt international conventions. I find that many international agreements are poorly ratified, such that while they may appear to establish international law, in reality they have little effect because they apply to only a handful of states. My research argues provides a theoretical framework that explains why ratification rate varies across agreements. I argue that preferences are persistent and that they influence both the negotiation and the ratification phases. I evaluate this theory with a quantitative test of 153 universal United Nations treaties. In addition, I use comparative case studies of six different agreements to illustrate how these mechanisms play out during treaty negotiations.

    Dissertation: "Hollow Commitments: An Analysis of Treaty Negotiations and Ratification Rate"

    Dissertation Committee Composition
    Jeannette Money (chair), Heather McKibben, Josephine Andrews

    Shaina Western CV
    E-mail: sdwestern@ucdavis.edu
    Website: www.shainawestern.com

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Placements

    Our program has been very successful in placing our graduates. Since 2000, almost all of our graduates from the PhD program have received tenure-track appointments in a variety of academic institutions. Below you will find profiles of some recent graduates and a list of placements.


    Spotlight on Placements
    Skyler CranmerSkyler Cranmer (PhD, 2007) is an Associate Professor at the Ohio State University, having previously been at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Skyler’s primary interest is in political methodology, in which he is conducting research in Bayesian statistics (particularly multiple change point estimation and reversible jump MCMC), missing data imputation, complex network analysis, and automated data gathering and content analysis. He spent 2006-07 as a visiting pre-doctoral fellow at Harvard University’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science and then remained there during 2007-08 as a post-doctoral fellow. Skyler also does research in the field of international Relations.  He has recent articles in Political Analysis, British Journal of Political Science, International Studies Quarterly, Policy Studies Journal, Conflict Management and Peace Science, Journal of Politics, Social Networks, and Physica A. Elizabeth SimasElizabeth Simas (PhD, 2011) is an Assistant Professor at the University of Houston. Her research uses both survey and experimental methodologies to explore the way candidates and voters behave in electoral campaigns, with a particular emphasis on the U.S. House. Among her achievements as a graduate student was receiving the Dean's Doctoral Fellowship for Excellence in Research. She is currently working on a number of projects, with working papers on the predictability and impact of candidate issue statements, partisan projection and bias in the assessment of candidate positions, and the individual effects of elite level polarization. Her work as appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Public Opinion Quarterly, and Political Research Quarterly.
    Zeynep Somer-TopcuZeynep Somer-Topcu (PhD, 2009) is an Assistant Professor at the University of Texas, Austin, having previously been at Vanderbilt University. Her research and teaching interests include a broad array of issues in comparative politics and institutions. She is currently examining political parties' policy changes in response to public opinion shifts and the consequences of these policy shifts on public opinion, election outcomes, cabinet formation and duration, and party leadership survival in both Western and Eastern and Central European democracies. Her work has appeared in the Journal of Politics, American Journal of Political Science, British Journal of Political Science, Comparative Politics, and Comparative Political Studies.  Her research has won a number of awards, and in 2013 she received the Emerging Scholar Award from the APSA section on Political Organizations and Parties.

    Jim ZinkJames Zink (PhD, 2010) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at North Carolina State University. Prior to joining the faculty at North Carolina State, Jim was a postdoctoral fellow at Emory University.  His primary research is in the history of political thought, with a special emphasis on early American political thought, Anglo-American constitutional theory, and the problems and possibilities of liberalism. He also has a secondary research agenda on the practical implications of ideas in the history of political thought, including experimental research concerning perceptions of judicial legitimacy. His recent publications include articles in the American Political Science Review, Journal of Politics, The Review of Politics, and Political Research Quarterly.

     

     

    Recent Placements
    (Tenure-track academic positions unless otherwise noted)
    Shareefa Al-Adwani American University of Kuwait (2016)
    Jesse Hammond Naval Postgraduate School (2016)
    Michelle Schwarze University of Wisconsin, Madison (2016)
    Timothy Taylor Wheaton College (2016)
    Richard Bairett Southern Utah University (2015)
    Wilfred Chow University of Hong Kong (2015)
    Christopher Hallenbrook Visiting Assistant Professor, Bloomsburg State University (2015)
    Tracy Lin Postdoctoral Scholar, University of California, San Francisco (2015)
    Kristina Victor Visiting Assistant Professor, University of California Sacramento Center (2015)
    John Warner Kansas State University (2015)
    Shaina Western Oxford University (Somerville College) (2015)
    Danielle Joesten California State University, Sacramento (2014)
    Matthew Pietryka Florida State University (2014)
    Alicja Jac-Kucharski Lone Star College, Kingwood (2013)
    Richard Johnson University of Strathclyde (2013)
    Debra Leiter University of Missouri, Kansas City (2013)
    Gail Pivetti Research Analyst, KSE Partners (2013)
    Ryan Reed Northwest Missouri State University (2013); currently at Bradley University
    Jack Reilly New College (2013)
    Michelle Schwarze Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Wisconsin-Madison (2013)
    Matthew Weiss University of Texas, Pan American (2013)
    Chris Albon Director, Governance Project, FrontlineSMS (2012); currently Director, Data Projects, Ushahidi
    Elissa Alzate Winona State University, Minnesota (2012)
    Niki Kalaf-Hughes Bowling Green State University (2012)
    Milosz Kucharski Lone Star College, CyFair (2012)
    Sarah Lockhart Fordham University (2012)
    Caitlin Milazzo University of Exeter (2012); currently at the University of Nottingham
    Carl Palmer Illinois State University (2012)
    Jennifer Wilking California State University, Chico (2012)
    Ibrahim Zabad St. Bonaventure University (2012)
    Kevin Evans Florida International University (2011)
    Kris Inman Social Science Researcher, Booz Allen Hamilton (2011)
    Alexander Mayer Research Associate, MDRC (2011)
    Elizabeth Simas University of Houston (2011)
    Jonathan Seth Snider Analyst, Department of Defense (2011)
    James R. Zink North Carolina State University (2011)
    Andrea Duwel Presentation High School (2010)
    Rolfe Peterson Mercyhurst College (2010)
    Aimee Tannehill Cryptanalyst, Federal Bureau of Investigation (2010)
    Monti Datta University of Richmond (2009)
    John B. Ryan Florida State University (2009); currently at SUNY, Stony Brook
    Belgin San Koç University (2009)
    Curtis Simon Mt. San Antonio College (2009)
    Zeynep Somer-Topcu Vanderbilt University (2009); currently at University of Texas, Austin
    Leo Blanken Naval Postgraduate School (2008)
    Skyler Cranmer University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2008); currently at The Ohio State University
    Nikolaus Emmanuel Oklahoma State University (2008); currently at the University of Copenhagen
    Gregory Love University of Mississippi (2008)
    Molly M. Melin Loyola University Chicago (2008)
    Jennifer Ramos Loyola Marymount University (2008)
    Gloria Walker Centenary College of Louisiana (2008)
    Olga Bogatyrenko SUNY, Fredonia (2007)
    Ryan Dudley California Maritime Academy (2007)
    Sarah Fulton Texas A&M University (2007)
    V. Gregg Garbesi United States Naval Academy (2007)
    Dana Zartner Tulane University (2007); currently at University of San Francisco
    Daniel Brunstetter University of California, Irvine (2006)
    Matthew Carlson University of Vermont (2005)
    Ryan Claassen Kent State University (2005)
    Michael Koch Texas A&M University (2005)
    Michael Rocca University of New Mexico (2005)
    Patricia Sullivan University of Georgia (2005); currently at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    Cynthia Boaz SUNY, Brockport (2004); currently at Sonoma State University
    Christian Erickson Roosevelt University (2003)
    Tiffany (Jones) Miller University of Dallas (2003)
    Kimberly L. Nalder California State University, Sacramento (2003)
    Bethany Barratt Roosevelt University (2002)
    Teena Gabrielson Southwestern University (2002); currently at University of Wyoming
    John J. Kennedy University of Kansas (2002)
    Richard Andres School of Advanced Airpower Studies (2001)
    Thomas G. Hansford University of South Carolina (2001); currently at University of California, Merced
    Stephen R. Routh California State University, Stanislaus (2001)
    Lisa Sharlach University of Alabama (2001)
    Craig Collins California State University, Hayward (2000)
    David Damore University of Nevada, Las Vegas (2000)
    Matthew Hoddie Texas A&M University (2000); currently at Towson University
    Monica Barczak University of Nevada, Las Vegas (1998)
    Stephen Nicholson Georgia State University (1998); currently at University of California, Merced
    Stacy (Burnett) Gordon University of Nevada, Reno (1997)
    Roger Rose Benedictine University (1997)
    Nancy Shulock California State University, Sacramento (1997)
    Linda Valenty San Jose State University (1997)
    Haeran Lim Seoul National University (1996)
    Catherine Nelson Sonoma State University (1996)
    Ross Miller Santa Clara University (1995); currently at University of Nebraska, Lincoln
    Caroline A. Hartzell Gettysburg College (1994)

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